Culture and Pain: The Effect of Culture on the Production of Endorphins in the Brain | Pioneer

Culture and Pain: The Effect of Culture on the Production of Endorphins in the Brain

About the Scholar: Joshua E. Roth  grew up in the United States and attended Northside College Preparatory High School in Chicago, Illinois

The Research:

Pain is a universal experience, but the perception of pain varies. Ritual practices that would be intolerably painful to outsiders seem to be painless to members of the cultures. Joshua’s proposed experiment would use naloxone, a drug that keeps the endorphins that block pain from reaching the pain receptors in the brain. Test groups would include outsiders and members of the cultures, some receiving the drug, some not. The reported experience of pain should reveal whether the cultural significance of the rituals causes the production of endorphins in members of the culture, providing insight into the physiology of pain.

ClientThe Car Rental Co
SkillsPhotography / Media Production
WebsiteGoodlayers.com

Project Title

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.