Would Limiting Animal Product Consumption Be an Effective Public Health Strategy? The Role of Industrial Farming in the European Union as a Catalyst for Food-Borne Disease Resulting from Antimicrobial-resistant Bacteria | Pioneer

Would Limiting Animal Product Consumption Be an Effective Public Health Strategy? The Role of Industrial Farming in the European Union as a Catalyst for Food-Borne Disease Resulting from Antimicrobial-resistant Bacteria

About the Scholar: Elis Sõõrd grew up in Estonia and attended Pearson College UWC in Victoria, Canada

The widespread use of antibiotics in farming and food animal production has led to a significant increase in antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB), accompanied by an increase in life-threatening diseases that can no longer be treated with the antibiotics now available. Pioneer scholar Elis realized that this general observation lacks precise details, and set out to determine how frequent such illnesses were, the most likely behavioral causes, and the most cost-efficient ways governments could address the issues. One small-sample study suggested that people who consume a vegan diet are much less likely to contract a food-borne zoonotic disease than omnivores or vegetarians.

ClientThe Car Rental Co
SkillsPhotography / Media Production
WebsiteGoodlayers.com

Project Title

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.